1 EAGLETON NOTES: The Common Pipistrelle Bat

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Thursday, 9 September 2010

The Common Pipistrelle Bat

In September 2008 I posted the following: 
The windows and doors at Maumulon have shutters. They keep out the worst of the winter weather and the storms. They keep out the midsummer midday sun. In the evening they keep out the many bats that fly around the house. Until this morning I had not thought of them as bat shelters. Then John pointed out that there were quite a few bats hiding away for the day. This is the first time I can recall seeing a bat close up in its natural habitat.

The Common Pipistrelle Pipistrellus pipistrellus is a small bat (3.5-4.5 cm long with a wingspan of 19-25 cm) whose very large range extends across most of Europe, North Africa, southwestern Asia, and possibly into Korea. It is one of the most common bat species in the British Isles. It is common in woodland and farmland but is also found in towns, where it roosts in lofts and buildings.
I've now taken more photos and am taking this opportunity to update the post with them:

7 comments:

  1. Looks like the dude that flew into my house earlier this summer. That was an adventure.

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  2. Pipistrelle, natterer bats and daubentons in New Lanark - tend to dive at you out of the darkness whenever you're walking home at night! Not sure that I like the look of them - though they are amazing in flight. Great photos.

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  3. I love these photos, Graham. Especially that last one where he (how do you tell the differnce?) is keeping a beady eye on you.

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  4. Strange pre-historic-looking creatures, aren't they? I've never seen one in real life.

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  5. Wow! Now, they are super! I've never seen one up close either. I'd love to! If I was a small furry mammal, I'd try and evolve into a bat. Seems sensible to fly if you possibly can, in my opinion.

    WV is hopethea which is a contraction of 'hope in the air' which means 'the desire to fly'.

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