1 EAGLETON NOTES: Swimmer

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Saturday 9 January 2021

Swimmer

Wild swimming seems to be the latest trendy thing to do presumably helped on by lockdown. I'm not a great lover of swimming in the sea here at the best of times. I'm not a strong swimmer and even in October when the gulf stream has warmed our water by a degree or even a degree and a half, it's still very cold. Swimming in the sea in New Zealand in the summer was far more bearable. Swimming in The Family's pool on a hot summer day was infinitely better.

On my way into town I go over an isthmus called The Braighe. I have blogged about it on several occasions. There are a hardened few who regularly swim its length on a Saturday morning. A few days ago I came across a lone swimmer. From where I was standing in 3ºC it was an ideal and very beautiful morning. However swimming in the sea would not have been my choice of a way to spend a couple of hours. 

A beautiful view of The Mainland
A beautiful view of The Mainland

A swimmer

Sunrise

On a slightly less swimmer-friendly day

42 comments:

  1. I wholeheartedly agree. Mad as a box of frogs is the swimmer.

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    1. I'm sure, Adrian, that he or she is fit as a fiddle but also mad as a box of frogs.

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  2. You could do it in a wet suit, Graham.

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    1. I left my wetsuits behind in New Zealand, Tasker, and I have absolutely no intention of getting into the sea here in any sort of a suit!

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  3. Gorgeous photos! But I get the shivers even thinking about it!

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    1. Thanks for your visit, Miss Kim, shivers is pretty mild description of that which I feel.

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  4. Serene photos

    Humans are amazing when their brains enter the world of the why what for!. I see no sensible reason to swim freezing water. Not a swimmer here.

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    1. Maywyn, I can see why they do it and I can also see why I do not!

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  5. Swimming is something I have not been doing in a long time! During the 10 years I spent my summers on Sicily, I enjoyed the beach and water of the Mediterranean just outside Siracusa, but I never felt entirely safe - when I am in the water, I am without my specs and can not discern if that dark blob underneath me on the sand is just a rock or something that could bite me.
    In the North Sea, I have paddled a bit, and also in the Baltic Sea when visiting my aunt on Bornholm. But such cold water is not for the faint hearted, which I freely admit I am.

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    1. Meike, when it comes to that I am faint of heart and faint of body.

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  6. Well this just makes break out in chill bumps. What is that thing he/she is towing behind?

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    1. Jill, me too. I think the float being towed behind is for valuables you don't want to leave on the beach eg your car keys as well as possibly your phone for emergencies and eg medication. I expect it is floatable enough to be used if you got a little exhausted and wanted flotation assistance.

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  7. I like the photograph of the wild sea.

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    1. Rachel, I love the view of the snowy Mainland too but there is something about wild seas that always lifts the spirits.

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  8. I think it is best enjoyed from the shoreline.

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  9. Bbrrrrrrr!! Swimming at those temps would certainly wake one up! :)

    Take good care, Graham. :)

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    1. I have never been a good swimmer and in later years I've not even been bathing in summer, so I'm certainly not going to try it in winter... I have an old friend living on the west coast (she also grew up there) who posts a lot of pictures (on FB) of herself swimming this time of year as well. (Or at least taking dips in the sea.) It's supposed to give a kick of endorphins, I think they say. I still prefer to keep my warm coat and boots on and stay dry, though...

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    2. Lee, it would send me into a state of hibernation I think.

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    3. Monica, I do know one person who goes for a quick sea dip below my house most days and she says it's the greatest endorphin kick she can get. It certainly wakes her up. As I said in my last comment I think I'd be comatose.

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  10. Now I could sand and watch the sea crash into the wall for a long time.

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    1. Red, I often do just that. It's very therapeutic.

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  11. Is that a water-tight container for his/her clothes? What a good idea. Too cold for me, but people in Brighton swim every day of the year; especially on Christmas Day. No thanks.

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    1. Cro, I think it's more for lighter things like car keys and the mobile that you might need for emergencies or if you don't want to leave it in the car.

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  12. It would be a bit too chilly for me at this time of year, but I believe it to be very beneficial. I'll be keeping my feet on dry land until summer. X

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    1. Jules, you have reminded me that I once decided to go for a morning dip in Derwentwater. It was a hot summer but I forgot that all the mountain streams that feed into the lake would reduce its temperature overnight. It was Baltic and I got quite a rude awakening. It was a fairly short swim!

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  13. Wild swimming this time of the year? No thanks. It's not even a good idea to finish my ablutions with the shower on Cold, my endorphins will have to fend for themselves.

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    1. Lesley, I love that your endorphins will have to fend for themselves. I shall use that!

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  14. I think that on my visits to the shore I will confine myself to watching for birds and noting their behaviour, which is doubtless far more rational and purposeful than silly humans swimming in water likely to produce a heart attack! I am afraid this is not for me. Every year there is a Polar Bear Swim in Lake Ontario to raise money for charity and while I support the good intentions of the participants, I feel they are quite daft! Better just to write a cheque, I say! Call me a wimp if you must; I will happily remain one.

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    1. Moi aussi, David. Frankly I wouldn't call anyone a wimp for not doing that. I'd call them sensible.

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  15. I really can't imagine swimming in 3 degrees. The water wouldn't be much warmer!
    I do love to watch a wild sea and I'd happily hang a photo like that one on my wall

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    1. Kylie, you made me wonder about sea temperature which I don't think varies tremendously around the Hebrides on Scotland's West Coast. Apparently today it is 8.6ºC (which seems very precise) with an air temperature above it of 2 ºC.

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  16. Looks beautiful there. Would you believe it here in NZ there are more and more beaches becoming polluted to the point where this Summer most of them around Auckland are too dangerous, it's sad.

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    1. Good heavens, Amy, that's terrible.I never noticed it when I was there I have to admit. Although I didn't spend much time in Auckland.

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  17. Love the delicate sky colour in your swimmer photos. I could happily paddle in icy cold waters, but would never dream of swimming in them. But, crashing waves - now, those are fascinating to watch (from a safe place!). They have so much energy and power in them, it makes you realize the power of nature is quite awesome :)

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    1. Margaret, I think living in New Zealand and Scotland makes one realise just how diverse and powerful nature can be.

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  18. Having had my hands in freezing pond water over the last few days there is no way I'd subject my whole body to that sort of thermal shock, regardless of how inviting it looks.

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  19. The area looks lovely, Graham, but I would prefer to remain on terra firma myself and let others go for a swim. That last photo would more than convince me of this decision.

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  20. How beautiful and calm the sea looked that morning. I have loved the warm seas of Greece, Fiji, India and Thailand - seas you can stay in for ages and still not feel chilled to the bone.

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    1. YP, I've never swum in a truly warm sea. Even the seas around much of New Zealand are not really warm.

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