1 EAGLETON NOTES: Remembrance

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Thursday, 3 January 2019

Remembrance

Yesterday I was fortunate and privileged to be invited to go along when the Stornoway Rowing Club  went out from the Inner Harbour to the Beasts of Holm (the rocks on which HMY Iolaire foundered). I was not rowing of course but got a ride on the safety rib. Some yachts accompanied the skiffs as well. We were fortunate in that the Minch was calm with little more than a breeze but it was cold with a temperature not much above freezing.

When the skiffs arrived at the site of the disaster 201 paper boats were floated, the crews sang a hymn and saluted those who lost their lives. It was both poignant and moving.

Gathering on the marina pontoons
The 'Lewis Diver' rib I was fortunate to go out on.
Rowing across the harbour
Rowing around the Beasts of Holm
Floating the paper boats and singing a hymn
SY233 'Jubilee' the last original ‘sgoth Niseach’. Ideally suited to fishing in Scottish coastal waters, the clinker-built, lug-rigged ‘sgoth Niseach’ took their skippers and crews into the unpredictable waters of the North Atlantic
The Iolaire lies between the marker on the rocks and the shore.
The Salute

21 comments:

  1. Sad...but a beautiful display of reverence and remembrance.

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  2. It's hard to keep the memory going but this was a good ceremony

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    1. I think, Red, that because it had such a big impact on such a small community it's not so hard to keep the memory alive here.

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  3. Is part of the wreck still there? It must be a fascinating dive site. The 'Jubilee' looks just perfect.

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    1. Yes, Cro. We were over the wreck and you can see the dark shape just below.

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  4. What a majestic sight. Well done all.

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  5. A good way to commemorate such a tragic event, unpretentious and dignified.

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    1. It was very well thought out, Meike, and I admire those who arranged it.

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  6. That was a real memorial event. Honest and solemn, but I hope there was a dram after.

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    1. Potty, I'm afraid that for some of us who had to drive home the dram had to wait until a bit later.

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  7. It’s really touching that the men who were lost are remembered after 100 years. Rather you than me going out on a little boat in the bitterly cold weather though.

    Beverley

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    1. Actually, Beverley, although it was bitterly cold I was't bad because I had layers for my torso and warm feet and hands. I could have done with a pair of thermal long johns though.

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  8. It was a great day I must say - apart from the cold.

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    1. Now I'm intrigued, O. Thank you for your visit and comment.

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  9. They were so close to land and the war was over. It seems like one of God's worst tricks.

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    1. It does indeed, YP. A local Minister has just got into a spot of bother by saying “We do not deserve to escape judgment, we have no right to expect deliverance. We have sinned repeatedly against God, and earned his wrath. Tragedies like the Iolaire are nothing less than we deserve as sinners against a Holy God. We have no excuse, no defence, no answer to the judgment of God.”

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    2. I hope someone pushes him off the ferry next time he travels to Ullapool.

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