1 EAGLETON NOTES: You Should see The Other Bloke

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Wednesday, 12 September 2018

You Should see The Other Bloke

A couple of months ago I was diagnosed with a carcinoma on my nose and a melanoma or two on my forehead.  This morning the consultant surgeon who removed the squamous carcinoma on my neck four years ago removed the nose lump and grafted skin from my neck to repair the hole.  The amount of damage on my forehead was such that she removed various bits so that they could be sent to the pathologist for analysis. 

I have to say that the whole operation was quite amazing. I had read some while ago that the anaesthetising of the nose was a deeply unpleasant experience so, whilst I wasn't concerned about the operations themselves, I was dreading the anaesthetic. As it was there was less discomfort from that than from the average taking of blood from one's arm and, as you will know, that is a pretty okay event.  So all in all there was no pain or discomfort and I haven't even had to take a paracetamol since the anaesthetic wore off. 

The nursing care was a mixture of efficient professionalism, comforting reassurance and light-hearted banter helped by the fact that one of the nurses had looked after me when I had my first bout of sepsis. 

My plans to go South and stay with my brother and sister-in-law have been thrown into the dustbin because my stitches will not come out for two weeks by which time it will almost be time for my Cancer Trial Review in Glasgow.  So I have re-scheduled the visit to October when, hopefully, there will be no obstacles to a relaxing time away.

Anyway the Good News is that I've been told not to undertake any strenuous work for the next week or two. Seems a bit unnecessary to me but I'm not going to argue. Hopefully I will be spending more time sorting my photos and catching up in Blogland.

44 comments:

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    1. Wow. That was quick, Maywyn. Thank you. I actually wrote that yesterday and I'm still feeling great today. I'm just going on a Blog visiting spree.

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  2. Wow- the outdoor life is catching up with you! Was just listening to the sunscreen song again recently... so glad all went well :0.

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    1. Fi, the strange this is that I have always worn a hat or a cap and in NZ I always slathered myself with sunblock. However, in the early days living on Lewis I didn't realise how very high the UV factor is here and out gardening or even out playing with the children on the beach for all those years probably did the real damage to my face and neck.

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  3. Well your beauty has been temporarily removed but it is all in a good cause. Hopefully you will get the stitches and dressings removed and order will be restored. I had a malignant melanoma removed on my back about 35 years ago. They removed a very small brown patch. In those days they took a lot of tissue round it and dug very deep so that I have a big crater in my back but hey, no more bother in all this time so that was all that mattered. Get your hat on and pulled well forward and no one will be any the wiser. Take care of yourself. Bev

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    1. Beverley, one thing I have never claimed is beauty or even vague handsomeness. Some may well argue that the more of my face that is covered the better I look.

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    2. Luckily, one does not have to claim beauty (or even vague handsomeness) in order to have it. You, sir, are lovely - whether or not you care to admit it. So glad the treatment was not as bad as you were dreading, here's to a speedy recovery, and a bright future slathered with mega-UV-blocking lotion!

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    3. Thank you kindly, Mrs S. The irony is that most of the damage was done years ago before I realised that the UV factor in the Outer Hebrides is very high indeed. In New Zealand sunblock was slathered on as a matter of routine.

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  4. Oh Graham, such a relief to know you are not in pain and it all seems to be going well! When I saw your photo and the first few lines of your post in my dasboard here on blogger just now, I was really worried. Now I am somewhat less worried.

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    1. Thanks for your concern, Meike. In fact it looks dramatic but apart from some inconvenience it's fine.

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  5. Good heavens! You have had more than your fair share of trials and tribulations in relation to your health. Lesser men would have allowed such episodes to plunge them into despair but your attitude always seems to be upbeat - the glass is half full not half empty. Get well soon Graham!

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    1. Thank you YP. I'm here to have to tell the tale. At the end of the day that's the bottom line.

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  6. Glad to hear it all went well GB. Hope you continue to feel as you do now.

    Will keep our fingers crossed that you make it down to The Wirral next month. I know that Dad and Jo are looking forward to it, xx

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    1. Thanks Helen. I have a few weeks to gather myself together and catch up with so many things that are on my non-physical 'to do' list. I hope upon hope that nothing else crops up. I really need to get down to The Wirral.

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  7. Great to hear that you sailed through this one. I hope you have a rapid and complete recovery.

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  8. I am glad that it all went well - you have a great team of medics on your case, and you must be glad to be in their good care. But you've been through quite a lot, so you deserve a bit of a break now. So enjoy your rest and get well soon.

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    1. I am remarkably fortunate Jenny. I can honestly say that I wouldn't change a single one of those people who look after me (and I am just one of very many of their patients so there should be a lot of happy people out there).

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  9. That does indeed sound like a smooth procedure. Do enjoy your "time off", you'll be as pretty as a picture in no time!

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    1. Pipistrello your comment reminded me of the chap who asked his doctor "Will I be able to play the piano after my procedure?" The doctor replied in the affirmative to which the chap responded that he was delighted because he had never been able to play the piano but he'd always wanted to. I've never been pretty as a picture and I don't expect this will change that. However I am grateful for the sentiment of your comment.

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  10. I read the title and thought 'Good Gracious! He actually BOPPED someone??' You have a remarkable ability to see the positive. I hope all our (your commentators) good vibes help too!

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    1. Kate, 'bopping' people is not my style (people have a habit of bopping back). I don't think my positivity is remarkable. I just talk about it more than most people! I am a proselytising positivitist.

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  11. That's the usual Sunday morning post Saturday night out look for some folk! I suppose it helps keep your specs up.

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    1. Potty, your statement is sad but true.

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  12. As always I can feel your gratitude behind your words, no matter what you are going through. God bless you, Graham! We need more like you. 👍

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    1. They are very kind words, Kay. Thank you.

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  13. This was the last thing I read last night before laying aside my phone... Good thing it ended on a positive note, as the headline and photo on their own would either have kept me wide awake or sent me off into nightmares... ;) ... Today I had half my face anesthetized myself at the dentist's. Also had my teeth scanned, which was a first. I half expected him to print out a new tooth on the spot, but apparently it still hasn't quite come to that - I'll have to wait another two weeks for it. (Temporary solution in place meanwhile, but orders to chew carefully...) Still made me reflect on the progress made in both dental and other health care in my own lifetime alone! Wish you good healing and hope you'll be able to enjoy a trip in October instead.

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    1. That's strange, Monica. I was absolutely convinced that I'd responded to your comment (and to Kay's above) before. I'm obviously losing the plot (or Blogger is). I hope you're chewing carefully! Good luck.

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  14. Amazing what they can do these days with the advances in medical science, hopefully you can have a bit of a rest while you recuperate.

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    1. Amy, I never cease to be amazed. When I had my prostate removed 20 years ago (using a new American technique) I was in the High Dependency Unit for 4 or 5 days and in hospital for many weeks. Now it can be a 48 hour stay and keyhole surgery. Then there was no chemo to follow up and now there are a raft of alternatives.

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  15. You look as if you'd just spent a weekend in South East London.

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    1. Cro, you've obviously not been to Stornoway on a Friday night (Saturday is quiet because of the impending Sabbath).

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  16. At least those cancers had the grace to come up at the same time, much easier to have them all done at once!
    I wish you fast and uncomplicated healing

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    1. Thank you Kylie. Yes. It's better to get it over and done with. And I always play the Glad Game. A friend had one on his lower eye area. That was a surgical challenge.

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  17. Well if it isn't one thing it's another. I think you must have my share of misfortune. Glad to see you are on the mend.

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    1. Adrian, I dodn't think of myself as having misfortune. I've just got minor irritations and I've adapted to making the best of the positive side of hospital visits: you meet wonderful people working as well as involuntarily visiting.

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  18. I think you look rather distinguished, in a battle scarred sort of way. Graham, I very much fear I was the person who said how painful the injection was, and it was, when I had it. I’m so glad in your case I was proved wrong! I wish you a very speedy recovery.

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    1. That's very kind of you to say so Frances - battle scarred or not! I'm afraid that your words stuck with me because I had realised for a long time that one day my nose was going to develop something. As it was it was only a BCC. It could have been a Squamous CC.

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  19. Get better soon. Hope you can shrink your bandage in a few days. That must be irritating at night.

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    1. Mrs Thyme, it's not too bad but the big bandage is off now and it is more comfortable I have to admit.

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  20. Graham, you are indeed a proselytising positivitist, but can you please find a phrase that is easier to say out loud. For your sake, I'm glad that the anaesthetising of the nose wasn't in the same category as the needle Frances and I had. It's always a pleasure to read your appreciation for the care you receive when you are subjected to yet another procedure. I hope you bounce back with your usual bounciness and get down country for your holiday as scheduled. I'm away up north to 90 mile beach, will send you mental greetings from the lighthouse. And pray for no mechanical problems.

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  21. Pauline, I'm sorry to have been so long in responding to your comment. I've had a problem with this post and when I couldn't respond to your comment by clicking on 'reply' I set off to find out why. I never did and I've only just remembered and returned to the post. I still can't use the 'reply' but at least I can (I hope) use the comment box. You've now had your (with no mechanical breakdowns) trip. It looked wonderful. Next week I should be off South> I'll send you a wee billydo.

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