1 EAGLETON NOTES: St Mary's Church, Cilcain

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Monday, 4 September 2017

St Mary's Church, Cilcain

One of my original purposes of blogging was to provide a diary of sorts or at least a reminder of things I've been doing. In Eagleton Notes I have rather lost track of that objective. When CJ, Partner Who Loves Tea and I went to Cilcain in North Wales in July and had lunch at the The While Horse about which I blogged we also popped over the road and visited the Anglican Parish Church of St Mary's The Virgin. If you are interested in knowing more about the church then there is information here and here so I won't bore you here.





15 comments:

  1. An interesting church with an unusual floor plan. By the way, I hope that St Peter in the stained glass window doesn't lose the keys to heaven when he's out on the razzle.

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    1. Yes YP, the double nave is very unusual. Unfortunately the public only have access to the North nave. You mean to say there are keys to heaven?

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  2. That's a difference way to build a sanctuary. It looks like this church has been preserved well.

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    1. It is indeed, Red, and I'm not why. Like many old churches in the UK it is preserved well.

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  3. The Wiki entry states that there is a hearse house in the courtyard. I have never heard of a hearse house but then even the oldest churches here are modern compared to a 13th century building.
    It's very easy on the eye and looking at a church like this, with no obvious recent renovations, I have to wonder why churches here have to be modernised every five minutes.

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    1. Kylie I had never heard of a hearse house attached to a church either nor have I ever seen another one: and I visit a lot of churches. However there are a few scattered around from the days of horse drawn hearses which might at one time have belonged to churches (but it had never occurred to me). Another thing to look up at some time!

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  4. I wonder how easy it is to clean out that roof valley and how often it needs to be done ?
    Roof valleys are a feature that I no fondness for at all.

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    1. Heron, my brother in law had a medieval house with two roof valleys the length of the house. They were a nightmare (and presumably still are). They were often very green, YP, which was, of course, the problem.

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  5. A place I'd have liked to have a closer look at, too. In spite of me not belonging to any religion, I really like churches; the older, the better.

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    1. Meike despite no longer having any religious belief I, too, love churches and generally find them very restful places where it can be good to meditate.

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  6. I love the wooden carving. What is it about wood that's so special?

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    1. Frances I love wood and I love silver. There is something about the tactile nature of wood and the fact that you can look at it and see so much in the grain and pattern and know that it was/is a living thing. Wood and silver go together too.

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  7. Old churches that have been restored and rebuilt and added to over the years often end up with a fascinating mix of architecture. I do like the "angles and angels" of this one! (And visiting the website, I especially enjoyed their exhortation to "Enjoy our angels!!")

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    1. Monica one often looks at churches in countries which have many such buildings that are around a thousand years old and forgets that they may well have been 'modernised' 500 years ago. This one has been quite altered over its history but is still a beautiful old building. I certainly did http://galenote.blogspot.co.ukjoy their angels' (and angles).

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