1 EAGLETON NOTES: Why?

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Saturday, 23 June 2018

Why?

I had often wondered why odd trees are left standing when a forest is harvested. It's only recently that I discovered the answer.



24 comments:

  1. Are they seed producers? Or a place for raptors to sit and look for prey?

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    1. The latter is the answer Terra: places for raptors.

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  2. Over here they simply take out what's wanted at any particular time. Our woods are basically Chestnut, Oak, and Pine, and it's not uncommon to find an area totally stripped except for Pine (which probably isn't fetching good money). Another year all the Pines will go; and so on. Of course this isn't Forestry Commission planting.

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    1. Cro, as you probably know almost all the commercial forestry in Scotland (and probably the UK) is coniferous and planted when the Government was giving huge tax incentives.

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  3. I always assumed lazy lumberjacks. I guess it's for hawks as I cheated and looked at your tag. Still suspect it's an excuse for indolence.

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    1. Adrian, it's probably an excuse for making raptors indolent.

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  4. I often wonder the same thing. I hope that with each tree that's cut down another one is planted in it's place to make our earth more sustainable.

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    1. Re-plant here is twenty to one. It allows for thinning and the blasted deer and rabbits.

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  5. I don't get it. I think because the left standing is a tree ID marker.

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    1. I think, Maywyn, that the foresters just leave some of the less commercial trees. They are kept for raptors to keep a watch for prey.

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  6. My Friend ((Forrestry Comm. (Rtd)) said that sometimes a request/report had to go to Europe if there were a nest or home of some species in the tree. They have to take all sorts into consideration.

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  7. Are they left so that bloggers and their visitors can have guessing games about them?

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  8. I don't quite understand but I suppose maybe it has rare creatures in it. Sometimes one is forbidden to restore buildings because they have rare bats in them, or build roads because of newts living in the area so it would make sense not to be able to chop down trees that have rare birds, or perhaps beetles making it their home. Well, that's my guess anyhow.

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    1. Jenny, from what Potty said that could occasionally be the case. However a perch for raptors is the most usual.

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  9. To allow you to photograph them....

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    1. I suspect, Lee, most people would consider them less than photogenic.

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  10. So that they don't have to wonder "where on earth was it that we once had a forest?" (???)

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    1. That's definitely the most original answer, Monica.

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    2. I wasn't clever enough to look at your labels for the post - as I now see that some of your other friends may have done ;)

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  11. For birds of prey to perch on top and spot small delicious animals that were left homeless when the beautiful forrest was obliterated!

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