1 EAGLETON NOTES: Sadness: RIP Merlin

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Monday, 28 August 2017

Sadness: RIP Merlin

I should have had the courage of my convictions. The raptor in the last post was, indeed, a Merlin. After everyone had convinced me to look for a reason as to how I could have been so mistaken after being so sure, The Fates intervened. I wish they hadn't. On Saturday the Merlin made an attempt to take a sparrow from the birdtable, overshot, crashed and broke a wing. Although I called the SSPCA and gave her water from a dropper she soon went into shock and died. This morning the ornithologist and vet confirmed that she was a Merlin and that she was far too small to be a female Sparrowhawk even if the markings had not been sufficient identification.

I'd rather have been wrong and that she had lived.



16 comments:

  1. Oh no, poor thing! These things happen, and of course we know they do, but it is extra hard to have it happening when we are there to witness it.

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    1. Yes, Meike, it was an unhappy moment.

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  2. Rest in Peace Merlin
    She lives on in blogland.

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    1. Maywyn you have given me a great idea for my epitaph!

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  3. That is an awful pity and unfortunately similar accidents do occur to various fledglings.

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    1. Yes, Heron, I frequently get the large outline of a pigeon on my windows but, oddly, have never yet seen one killed. Starlings on the other hand seem to have very unforgiving heads.

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  4. Oh what a shame, that is so sad. Poor thing.

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    1. It was, indeed, Serenata. I suppose there is a sparrow somewhere playing the Glad Game.

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  5. How very sad. Why is it that sick wild things, lovingly nurtured in cardboard boxes, always die (I've had several)? As you say, Graham, probably the shock.

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    1. Yes, Frances, when they go into shock it's quite horrible.

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  6. Oh! How dreadfully sad!
    It is some consolation that she was appreciated and cared for.

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    1. Well, Kylie, given the number of cats in the area it could have been even more unpleasant all round.

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  7. That's a sad close encounter. They are beautiful to watch when they go into a dive

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  8. We have several large plate glass windows/doors, so I know the sadness. The last to succumb was a Cuckoo.

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    1. Cro I have a friend who gets woken up every morning at a certain time of year by a cuckoo 3 metres from his kitchen window. He probably would not share your sadness.

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