1 EAGLETON NOTES: Safari Day 4: Harris

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Friday, 9 October 2015

Safari Day 4: Harris

Day 4 of our safari saw Pauline and I travel down to Harris. For some reason I took fewer photos than I usually do but I know that Pauline tool lots so I will simply show you a few of St Clement's Church in Rodel at the southern point of the Island. For those who would like to know more about the church the Historic Scotland website may be of interest.






22 comments:

  1. I wish I had found somewhere to park. I did visit the shop and filling station a bit further down the road.
    Glad you posted this....I should have made a greater effort to see it.

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    1. I think, Adrian, that you could produce some 'different' photos of the church (and probably the green things growing).

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  2. That church looked beautiful, Graham. Lovely photos.

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    1. Frances it's certainly a very atmospheric building.

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  3. Nice pictures. What a vicious group of clansmen they and the MacDowels were at that time. Goodness!

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    1. Mrs Thyme they were violent, uncertain times and choosing the 'right' side was very important for survival.

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  4. Except for the gravestones outside I wouldn't have felt quite sure from the first pictures whether I was looking at a church or a small fort! Impressive building.

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    1. Sometimes Monica it can be difficult to know even in reality when churches were not also used as a sort of fortress.

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  5. I would think that probably a church often had to act as a fortress in those times. It's a magnificent building- thanks for sharing.

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  6. There's lots of history when buildings like this are preserved. Building structure alone is a big story in this one.

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  7. Presumably no longer used for its original purpose. The stone work is so different to here; very interesting. It also looks as if at some time it's been open to the elements.

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    1. I'm sure, Cro, that I should know but I can't recall when it was de-consecrated. It has occasionally been used for weddings in recent times but not as a consecrated building. I'm not sure that it's been open to the elements but, for as long as I can remember, it's had a dankness about it and there's always been the green bits which, I (rightly or wrongly) assumed, were caused by damp coming through the ground/stone.

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  8. A beautiful and very unusual building. From its emptiness I assume it is not used as a church anymore?

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    1. Meike it hasn't been used as a church for many years but I can't recall exactly how long.

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  9. I'm loving flicking from Pauline's posts, to yours and back and forth again! Please promise me that you will post those bird shots with the "big gun". And please also promise me you will continue to share photos of your walks, travels and birds long after you've finished this series!!

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    1. Liz I shall post some of the bird pictures soon.

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  10. I went to The Historic Scotland website as you suggested in order to read about St Clement's. I admire the austere hardiness of its construction - perhaps more like a fortress than a church.

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    1. Yes YP I think you are correct particularly given the times when it was built.

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  11. What an interesting church....and the tomb too.
    It all reminded me of an underground monastery somewhat....thanks for posting.

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    1. Virginia it's an interesting and atmospheric building but I have difficulty getting any feeling for it as a church.

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