1 EAGLETON NOTES: Washing Machine Detergent

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Saturday, 10 February 2018

Washing Machine Detergent

How sexy and grabbing is that for a blog post title?


So much has been said about plastics recently that I was drafting my tuppence-worth when I read the label on a bottle of washing machine detergent (it is called so many things these days). I actually wanted to see what the number was in the re-cycling triangle on the base. I was astonished. I've obviously never read one before and I was completely taken by surprise. 

How many of us have read the labels despite a message hidden amongst all that small print exhorting us to do so? How many of us knew that it is severely deleterious to eyes? All that and much more is in the small print on the back of the bottle. On the front in very large letters it is emphasised as being suitable for sensitive skin: so much friendlier.

By the way do you have any idea what the red diamond sign means? Well so far as I can gather it means corrosive substance to materials and flesh. That doesn't sound very good for sensitive skin (or any skin) so far as I can make out.




33 comments:

  1. Wear eye protection? They mean, every time you do your laundry and handle the detergent bottle, you should wear a pair of goggles...? Also interesting: On the back, it says "produced in Belgium", while the front proclaims "made in the UK".

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    1. I blame the American legal system Meike. The sue-for-everything culture arrived in Britain some years ago and now everyone has to cover themselves for every possible eventuality. The 'produced in' mix-up was my fault for putting the fronts and backs in different orders. One is made in Belgium and the other in the UK.

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  2. Graham it might assist if you were to inform us whether you have a sceptic tank ?

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    1. Hern I hav just found this comment in the Blog's spam folder. I had missed it until checking today. Apologies. The answer to your question is in the negative. The house is on main drains.

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  3. Good post raising a good point
    I buy skin sensitive detergents. I don't read the full label. What now?

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    1. Maywyn I'm sure we'll all just carry on as usual. I shall certainly be careful to make sure I never rub my eyes after handling the stuff.

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  4. I think all detergents have similar warnings, even those that are supposed to be perfume-free and suitable for sensitive skin etc... At least my laundry detergents and my washing-up liquid do. Well mine do not mention to wear eye protection... But they do have the same instructions (in Swedish) about rinsing etc if you should happen to get it in your eyes. I am rather used to checking the small print, as I am allergic to some things. As I have to do my laundry in a common laundry room, I also always start by cleaning out the little drawer for washing powder etc (whether it looks clean or not) to make sure I don't get residues of someone else's stuff. (And when doing this, I wear gloves...)

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    1. Gosh, Monica, I've just checked my washing up liquid and it has similar warnings particularly with reference to eyes. However it also suggests not using it on you hands for too long. As it happens I do not use washing up liquid very often because most things go in the dishwasher. I hate to think how corrosive and nasty dishwasher detergent is.

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    2. GB, I read your comment too quickly, and thought you said you were putting your clothing in the dishwasher.... HAH!

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    3. Graham, I always use gloves when washing up. (Never had a dishwasher.)

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  5. Love it! Remember to war one of those all in one crime scene outfits, plus mask, when you do your washing, Graham. I'm not going to read the label on mine. I'd rather not know 😀

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    1. Well, Frances, I'll be the one who can still write letters if your hands fall off!

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    1. Jill, Frances is just a natural born rebel when it comes to reading labels and instructions. Mind you this is the first time in 73 years that I've read a detergent bottle label!

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  7. they speak out of both sides of their mouth.

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  8. It's amazing what additives are put into products we use regularly. there are only a couple of certain brands of shampoo, soap and washing powder I can use, most of them make my skin break out.

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    1. Amy, I dare not read a shampoo bottle in case it says 'dangerous to eyes'.

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  9. Our kitchen cupboards contain enough chemicals to melt concrete. We seem shackled to them too.

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    1. Cro, I had a brief look at the large collection of things I have for household and garden use. They make lead and asbestos look positively benign.

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  10. It's the same with many things. I have some plastic gloves that are supposed to save me from diesel and oils. The packet says may cause a dermatological reaction. Diesel and oil never have.
    Callum never used to wear gloves when using descaling acid gel. Persuaded it might be a good idea, he took them off for his tea break and put them back on inside out. Lovely smooth hands he had and very clean.

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    1. I shouldn't have found you comment so amusing, Adrian, given that someone might have been seriously hurt, but I'm sorry to say that I laughed aloud.

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    2. We laughed as well. Callum is an idiot. He had been moaning to anyone who would listen that his hands got too warm wearing the nitrile gloves and he didn't like the purple colour. He looked like a leprosy victim for a day or so. For weeks it didn't matter where he went folk wanted to see his fingers.
      It was a culture shock when first I worked with Spaniards...They are really upset by a fellow humans injury or misfortune, a bit queer they are. Here we just roll about laughing at folk suffering a minor injury, the dafter the cause of it the more merriment is enjoyed.
      Yesterday mornings work was even better as whilst we were changing a drag hook on a big New Holland tractor in finger freezing weather we got to discussing how nice it would be to work in a hot place for Oxfam. Swapping a slice of bread for totty after work. Callum said he would take some Tunnocks tea cakes, reckoned he would be set up for life. Then Andrew said they are nothing but dirty pedalos and have you noticed you never see them working in freezing rain. Lazy nesh perverts they are. Not catch anyone normal working for them.

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  11. my daughter pulled the filter out of our washing machine just this week and got a burn from the detergent & water left in it so yes, it deserves respect. The "sensitive" ones are just perfume free so not really all that skin friendly

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    1. Kylie, I would have thought that perfume was the least of a user's concerns, as you said.

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  12. Thank heavens my darling wife does all of our laundry - protecting me from potential hazards!

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  13. The small print on products is getting smaller and smaller...either that or I'm going blind! I always have two pairs of glasses with me in my wallet...one for reading up close and personal (and I still can't read the small print), and the other pair for long-range, product-on-the-shelf-viewing!!

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    1. I think one of the problems, Lee, is that regulations and legal liability require so much information that often the goods just don't have sufficient room for it all.

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  14. Good grief it sounds horrific stuff. Best not to read it. ITs even worse when you read the little sheet that comes with bottles of tablets or medication. All the side effects are scary. Blogger friend, Trudi from "Lavender and Vanilla" has a recipe for making your own detergent.

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    1. Sorry, Diane, I forgot to respond to your comment because I went off in search of Trudi and got waylayed. I'll have to start all over again. As for medication information sheets I tend to read and instantly forget.

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  15. How alarming. Imagine having to wear goggles to use it. Unless specs count as eye protection. I might start considering simply using liquid soap.

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    1. Jenny, I read and the only thought I had was that it would make a good blog post!

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