1 EAGLETON NOTES: Art

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Friday, 22 January 2016

Art

Cro has posted a few references to art recently that have made me think (quite an achievement at the best of times).  One related to Joyce Pensato and Rose Wylie: two artists of whom I had never heard. During the comments (Cro's posts usually provoke good discussions) Cro said "I think we 'trained' painters see things quite differently to others. We spend so much time studying composition, colour, positives and negatives, size, shape, form, you name it we studied it. Looking at paintings then becomes a whole new world where the final thing we usually notice is the subject matter. Of the 2 above I much prefer Rose Wylie's work; it takes me away on crazy journeys."

Now to be honest whilst I would stand and contemplate their work in a gallery their art is not something for my walls.  That made me recall that on several occasions over the years I have said, in answer to comments on my blogs, that I would post some pictures of the art I do have. On the whole it's reasonably conventional. I thought I would start with a few paintings (some of my art is pottery).

The first is entitled "An Unmade Bed' and is by David Woodford. There is a story behind it.

About 10 years ago I was being shown round an acquaintance's house in New Zealand. In the master bedroom was a painting. As I was standing in front of it tears came to my eyes and I just stood there weeping. I have no idea why. I cannot ever recall a painting having such a deep effect on me before or since. I have problems keeping images in my head but the subject of that picture remained with me. The acquaintances became friends. The subject of the painting was never mentioned again. A few years ago in New Zealand I was at a family occasion and so were they. Completely out of the blue I was handed the painting with the words. "This painting was obviously meant to be with you. It is yours now." 

I have never really felt that I actually own any work of art. They will outlast me. I am only a custodian but, in this case, a custodian of an object with great emotional meaning.


The second is a relatively recent acquisition and is by Philip Raskin from a friend's gallery


This water-colour was bought in Tuscany one summer in the '90s when there was some flooding in the valley where we bought this which was really quite strange given the fabulous weather we'd had.


This "The Leaving of Lewis" is by Deborah Cameron and is one of the most atmospheric of works.


30 comments:

  1. I do prefer your preferences, your paintings much, much more than those of Pensato and Wylie, Graham. Excuse the pun but they're a bit too far off the wall for me!

    I love the works of Dali and Picasso and similar others, but those I've seen of Pensato and Wylie are a bit to simplistic for me...and yet, I suppose in the eye of a true, educated beholder they're not simplistic at all.

    Of course, as with most things in life, it's all to do with individual tastes and likes.

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    1. Lee you are, of course, correct in that so much is to do with individual tastes but as to what is 'good' or 'bad' art you and I might judge things with a completely different set of values to those who are trained in the subject.

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  2. I do like your taste in art. It is interesting how we come to own the art work that we do. It all tells a story.

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    1. Thank you Country Mum (I'm never quite sure whether I should use your proper name so I'll play safe). There are certainly stories behind many of the artworks I own.

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  3. Your art works (including the pottery) are beautiful. "The Leaving of Lewis" is captivating. As I was leaving Lewis I thought about how many stories were written in the wake of that ferry and that my story was there now, too. I love the Tuscany watercolour because it reminds me of Georgia. It's wonderful that you are now the keeper of the beautiful painting that touched your heart.

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    1. Pauline "The Leaving of Lewis" certainly reminds me every day of just how much I love my home Island.

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  4. You are so very responsive to art, and it is a wonderful thing.Your paintings obviously feel almost like friends. Well, I think certain images ARE like friends. I am always so pleased that my Malaga photo connected with you, of course. You have sent me photos of some of these and you described the water lapping the edge of the road when you bought the Tuscan water colour, which seemed a most curious thing since I don't imagine Tuscany as being wet, ever! I don't, actually, think I ever sent you any photos of anything on my walls. *Or did I send you pictures of the tapestries? I can't remember.)

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    1. Jenny most of my pictures do feel like friends and because I have nowhere near enough wall-space for them all I feel quite bad about it for those which are languishing in the loft or in cupboards (either temporarily awaiting their turn on a wall or for longer periods out of sight) and which I therefore cannot look at daily. I don't think (and even with my memory I think I would have recalled that) you have ever sent me pictures of the tapestries.

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  5. But what we really need to see is the still unpainted "Untitled" by Graham Edwards. You have the art materials and you have the time (I think) so it's time to get cracking young man! No more procrastination!

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    1. YP time and courage are the two things I have least of for this project. Of course time is a matter of priorities but courage is a matter of mind. If I were ever to start I can well imagine that I would never be satisfied with the result. So if I never start then I never have to go through that. Having said that after I get back from NZ at the end of March I am due to have a knee replacement. That will severely curtail my garden and outside projects for a while so I will have to decide between sorting 66 years of photographs and perhaps attempting the picture.

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  6. You have some interesting art pieces that influence you.

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  7. I do like your unmade bed, and also the frame it's in (which is very important). I have a very eclectic choice of works in my own home; the only things banned, being reproductions.

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    1. Thank you Cro. The frame is such an important part of the overall work isn't it? I can imagine that your choice is pretty eclectic but certainly less conservative than mine. I do have a few limited edition prints and even a large unlimted one which was a gift but one with a very special significance. They will doubtless appear in future posts.

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  8. I absolutely love "The Unmade Bed" (and the frame)! It certainly does evoke emotion. I also love "The Leaving of Lewis"

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    1. Thank you Liz. I'm quite surprised that The Unmade Bed is so enjoyed.

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  9. None of these are awful but I do like the Philip Raskin image. It's perfect.

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    1. I'm astonished by your statement Adrian. You, a bastion of grammatical correctness, have put 'none' and 'are' together. Yes Philip Raskin has a style and way of presenting colours that really appeals to me too.

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  10. The "unmade bed" (plus its frame) would be my No. 1 choice of this collection. Incidentally, my old bed - before I gave my bedroom a complete make-over for my 40th birthday - was very much like that, except for it usually being made whenever I was not in it.

    It's interesting to note what effect a certain piece of art has on us, and it is not always clear why. Sometimes it just "speaks" to us, doesn't it?
    Maybe I'll nick the idea to this post of yours and write about some of the art that has touched me most (but is not owned by me).

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    1. Meike I am so pleased that you, too, love The Unmade Bed. Somehow I just cannot imagine you laving a bed unmade if you were not in it (any more than I would leave one unmade either).

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  11. I do so agree that while there is a lot of art that one might find interesting when seeing in a gallery, that's not at all the same as wanting to see it daily in one's own home. Most of my life I've not been able to afford to buy original art by professional artists. What I have on my own walls is mostly my own watercolours + other 'amateur' works by family or friends (watercolours, pencil, acrylic, embroidery, woven, batik...) And now also a few inherited pieces. But those too were chosen by my personal feeling for them rather than what they might be worth to anyone else. - I like all four pictures you are showing above, but especially the Raskin and the watercolour with the umbrella.

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    1. Monica my pictures are relatively inexpensive in art terms but have some special meaning for me. The Raskin is an emotional mixture of colours and textures which I find utterly compelling whilst the watercolour with the umbrella is attractive for its whimsey and the memories it evokes. It's a shame the photography doesn't do it justice.

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  12. "two artists of whom I'd never heard." Music to my ears. Be still, my heart, I think I'm in love! Hugs, GB!

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    1. Ah DeeDee there are some things that still are so deeply ingrained however I'm sad to say that I do occasionally end sentences with prepositions. However for years the statement with my profile stated "I am he whom I am" until it was pointed out that that was incorrect. I'm still not quite sure why!

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  13. I like them all, but I loved The Leaving of Lewis the best....I imagine if I were ever to visit your island that as I sit on the departing ferry this would be the lasting image created in my mind.
    Being a sea loving person, it's only natural that I like this one the best....the gorgeous blue colour is truly captivating.

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    1. Virginia on a beautiful day the sea really looks like that: a deep deep blue. You really would love it.

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  14. I really, really want the Philip Raskin. And as you're only the custodian.....?

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    1. Well Frances these things can always be arranged.

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  15. James Elkins wrote a fascinating book "Pictures and Tears" to investigate the diverse and complex experiences of people who have found themselves in tears in front of paintings. It has only happened to me once - as I walked into the space in front of a tall Emily Kngwarreye Yam Dreaming painting. Strange isn't it. Jean

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    1. Thanks for that lead Jean. He has written quite a few interesting books on art by the look of it. I shall investigate. I had a look at, and read about, Big Yam Dreaming. It is fascinating and I think I can see why one might well be moved to tears by it.

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