1 EAGLETON NOTES: Snow

.

.

Sunday, 26 April 2015

Snow

What a contrast this morning to the sun we've had recently. I know this will be short-lived but, even so, it came as a bit of a surprise.

The Grape Hyacinths might survive
These may not
It won't worry the goldfish or tadpoles
Some of the new plants might not like it though
The many 'wild' daffodils in the croft have met their end

29 comments:

  1. Lovely and sunny here but it's just started raining again.
    That looks miserable and wet......Good luck plants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adrian we've been through everything today even blue skies and sun but not, I have to admit, warmth.

      Delete
  2. Love how the snow has attached itself to one side of everything vertical ~ I guess that is because of the prevailing wind. You can keep that kind of cold GB.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes Carol the wind was pretty strong today. In fact it still is even though the snow has long gone.

      Delete
  3. I love daffodils. Won't they recover? We have had snow on our daffs and they bounce back. Unless the plants are broken, then they can't bounce back! We should take a lesson from this...just bend with problems but don't let them break us!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kay you were right they have recovered. I would never have believed it. I thought the cold, snow and wind had done for them.

      Delete
  4. We finally, finally had some long awaited rain yesterday, and after a beautiful sunny morning and early afternoon today, it is just beginning to rain again as we speak (or as I type).
    Hopefully, I won't have to see any snow until December, I am so not keen on it! Also, I hope that most of the flowers and animals in and around your garden will survive this white surprise.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well Meike almost everything seems to have survived....so far anyway and much to my surprise.

      Delete
  5. Ah, I know the feeling. We got about 5-6 cm of snow. We don't have any plants as far advanced as your plants.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your weather is far more sever than the weather on Lewis Red. Being an island and my house being so close to the sea snow is rare.

      Delete
  6. You certainly get Weather where you are! We've had little variation this winter, although the spring has been sudden and beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Snow is quite unusual where I am Frances but we had all four seasons (except warmth) that day.

      Delete
  7. Lovely images! Especially from so far away. Repeated frosting the thawing, I believe, is harder on plants. When I went to England in ?66 there was also a late snow, much to my delight. We went to a churchyard and built a snowman... Dad has it all on .

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kate I have known snow in the English Lake District in June but that was pretty rare. Snow in some of the north facing corries on the Scottish mountains can last most of the year.

      Delete
  8. Oh, my goodness, Graham! I swear by all things holy and good, I did not send that weather to you from Colorado! I swear!!! (But, just in case I have no input with the weather gods at all, and you did get this little spring blip from Colorado, well..........look for another blip in about three days. Yep, more snow!)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you didn't Peace (sorry I can never quite decide how to address you) and I'm not taking the weather blips personally! Snow is so unusual here on the Island it's blogworthy whereas for you it's the norm. I just can't imagine that.

      Delete
  9. Good grief, and I thought our spring weather was changeable! I do hope those poor Hyacinths survive. And that the weather improves!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Pauline the hyacinths did survive much to my surprise. I've learned a lot being here this winter or perhaps I should say that I've re-learned a lot having been away for so long.

      Delete
  10. Visual evidence to support the old warning - Ne'er cast a clout till May is out.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Absolutely YP. Mind you I've been casting my clouts for a few weeks and hopefully 'twill not be in vain.

      Delete
  11. I had forgotten all about that saying "ne'er cast a clout till May is out" and now I've seen it three times today. Your Polar Plume was cruel, but those early flowers are a hardy bunch.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are absolutely right VioletSky: they proved more hardy than I imagined.

      Delete
  12. I thought I commented here, but it seems not. Maybe it was on FB, or else it just disappeared into cyberspace. I know I intended to say something to effect of many plants being more resilient to this kind of throwback than one might think. (Not uncommon here in Sweden in April...) Anyway I'm glad to see from your replies to comments that most of the plants do seem to have survived.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I remember you saying that Monica so it was either on Facebook or it has disappeared into the Google Void. I've just checked and it was on Facebook.

      Delete
  13. Oh dear! It always surprises me, though, how well everything does deal with this kind of sudden weather reversal. At least you are snug and warm inside!

    And never mind, it is nearly May. that's nearly summer. So that's the end of the snow.... isn't it? :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, Jenny, hopefully it is here but I do recall snow in the Lake District in June!

      Delete
  14. SNOW?????? Where on earth (or heaven) did that come from?
    Hope your newly planted plants survive.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Virginia it came and it went but the weather here remains unseasonably cold.

      Delete