1 EAGLETON NOTES: Unhappy Birds

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Sunday, 11 January 2015

Unhappy Birds

One of the things I forgot to do before the storm was take the bird table off the post. That'll be an oops then. The wind did it for me. In fact the whole base was torn apart. I've put the structure back below the post for the photo but it was actually blown as far as the far edge of the garden where the fence stopped it careering down to the sea. The next base will be stronger! However what is both upsetting and amusing is that the birds just can't work out what has happened. They keep going to their usual perches away from the bird table and then flying to it as if it were there and just looking very confused. 


18 comments:

  1. You need an iron one welded up like proper so them scouser winds can't have it away.

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    1. Adrian you should know that welded iron would be no deterrent to a scouser: they go around with cordless angle grinders attached to their belts. That's what the wind felt like too. I've just been told that sheets of corrugated iron from up the village must have flown over several houses and have landed up at the bottom of the croft by the sea. Scary!

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  2. Poor birds! (Where, by the way, do little birds go d u r i n g a storm??) I took in the bench from my balcony before going to bed last night, and probably good thing I did, because in the morning I found that the wind had turned over one of my three clematis flower pots - down on the floor in a corner and the plant still hanging on to the trellis that I'd tired the best I could to secure against the wall. Whether the plant will survive or got broken remains to be seen in the spring! According to the morning newspaper there was some storm damages around here like a tree fell over the road at the supermarket and stopped traffic there for an hour or so yesterday. Well at least not as bad as I heard later on the radio from one of the big islands off the east coast where the roof blew off a supermarket...

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    1. I'm not sure, Monica, where all the birds go but I assume that the ones that live under my eaves retire there. There's been a huge amount of damage to roofs around the Island and lots of electricity infrastructure damage. Shop windows in town blew in or were hit by slates too.

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    2. I can imagine there must have been, as even here in Sweden the same storm caused quite a lot of similar damage. Not quite as bad as the legendary one ten years ago but my paper this morning estimated the damages to about 50% of what we experienced back then.

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  3. What a kind man you are Graham. But now about your house? Ad have you got your bin back?

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    1. The house has escaped with only minor damage thanks Frances. I've been lucky. If corrugated iron sheets can be blown from up the village down to the shore then my light compost bin will undoubtedly have made it as far as the sea. There's nothing between me and the sea to stop it.

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  4. Everyone's talking about your storms GB. James is home and especially sends his love. He said the time spent with you was the best time he had in the

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    1. Yes Kate they seem to have hit the headlines. That's really lovely to know. It was certainly wonderful having him to stay.

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  5. It's easy to confuse a bird. Just give her a road map and ask her to navigate.

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    1. Oooh YP. In political parlance that statement would be regarded as 'brave'. 

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  6. The birds are depending on you GB....please hurry and fix their buffet feeding station.
    As for YP's comment above, I shall remain quiet on that one.....

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    1. Well I try Virginia. Unfortunately I don't think I will be able to fix it before I go away on Wednesday morning.

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  7. Typical animal behaviour. Why they don't catch on that it's gone is a mystery to me. A farmer's barn was blown away in a windstorm. The cows still dutifully walked to their places even though the barn was gone.

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    1. Oddly, Red, I knew that about cows but I didn't make the mental connection. Silly me.

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  8. Poor birds! We had a different avian drama here yesterday. When I got up and looked out of the kitchen window, I saw the remains of a pigeon on the grass underneath the big pine tree in my neighbours' garden. Crows were all over the place, fighting over a blood-dripping wing. The one that got away with the wing sat in the tree fright across my kitchen window, feasting on it for hours, while the others took care of what was still on the ground. I don't know how the pigeon died. My guess is a buzzard got it originally and was chased by a bunch of crows. For its own safety, a buzzard will wisely rather let go of its pray than risk being injured and starve to death because it won't be able to hunt anymore. So the crows got what they wanted, and the buzzard had to go find something else for dinner.

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    1. Wise buzzard. Crows can so easily disable one. I really am not a fan of crows even though they are so intelligent.I've seen the take the eyes out of a newborn lamb. Nature can be most unpleasant at times.

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