1 EAGLETON NOTES: Last Night

.

.

Friday, 9 January 2015

Last Night

We had a storm. Another one. This one, however, was a Big Storm in terms of strength if not so big in terms of duration. It was all over in about 10 hours although the next one is rolling in from the Atlantic as I type. The winds reached 113 mph (182 kph) at Stornoway Airport just a few miles from here. It felt and sounded like a jet plane and a heavy goods train passing by at the same time. Ten years ago almost to the day I lost my conservatory in a hurricane lasting nearly 24 hours although that one also had gusts of 147 mph (237 kph).


75,000 homes in Scotland also lost power: many for the night and some are not yet back on. We were  off from around 2330 until 0930 and so was the cellphone network. Why do storms always feel worse at night and when there is no power and no communication?

This time the damage to my property was slight: the guttering on the conservatory, the chimney pot cowl (which I found about 100 m down the croft just by the sea), one of my compost bins has vanished completely and I've lost a few trees and bushes.   I've heard of a lot of damage round about and apparently there are film crews up near Stornoway where two houses have been badly damaged. I did meet this van which had been lifted from the side of the road and bodily thrown onto the beach. Try explaining that to the hire company.


Another storm is forecast for this evening but it's supposed to be fairly innocuous with winds just up to 80 mph. Hey ho. Wotthehellarchiewotthehell.

35 comments:

  1. I see you had the highest winds. It was an exciting night. I was recording 66mph average and 72mph as a high. Thunder and lightning a wonderful storm. It zipped through quick sticks and apart from being without electrics for fourteen hours no harm done. I love a good storm. All mended now and the next depression is something and nowt. Scottish Power are great at fixing things full marks to them.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Adrian there was a time when I would say that I love a good storm but I've lived through 5 hurricanes now (counting this one) and, frankly I'd be happy to leave it at that.

      Delete
  2. Replies
    1. Thanks Sue. So far so good. Your call to abandon the visit was a good one.

      Delete
  3. Ah, one of the pitfalls in living in such a beautiful area! Always worse at night because I think we feel more vulnerable. Glad damage was minimal this time.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Serenata. We are always more vulnerable at night aren't we?

      Delete
  4. I hope there was no one inside the van at the time... It does look like it could be a bit difficult getting it "back on track"! We'll probably be getting some of the leftovers of that storm tomorrow. (Or if not that one, another one.) I'll give you a shout if I see a compost bin flying by...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Monica it had been parked overnight by a Minister moving to the area. I think he's learned the hard way that you don't park big vehicles in exposed areas here when there's a good blow going. I suspect my compost bin ended up in the sea so it could end up anywhere.

      Delete
  5. Glad you're okay, and hope that the next storm is less fierce than predicted. Take care, xoxox DeeDee

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks DeeDee. The 'next' storm is upon us and it's the Shetland Isles that are bearing the brunt this time.

      Delete
  6. So that's where the compost bin came from! It's on our patio with the upside down furniture.
    Seriously, glad you're OK and not too much harm done.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks CJ. I'll collect the bin next time I'm down.

      Delete
  7. Oh, poor you! Yes - everything's worse in the dark, isn't it. I'm, glad you're okay.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Putting it into perspective Frances what we generally have to put up with is pretty minor compared with what many people in the world suffer. I always think of that when I'm cowering in my very comfortable bed in the warmth wondering if my window is going to cave in.

      Delete
  8. Oh nooo! Snuggle down and just wait it out. Do you have power back yourself? I know you have a generator...

    ReplyDelete
  9. Oh. I just read your post properly. You do.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I snuggled it out Kate and the 'next' storm which is now upon us is less fierce for us (so far anyway).

      Delete
  10. Oh dear ~ a Thankful Thursday post i suggest.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Carol for reminding me that I really should resurrect my Thankful Thursday posts.

      Delete
  11. Oh my goodness GB, at least you're okay. That storm was pretty serious.
    Having to face such awful winter storms must be making you miss NZ right about now.
    Kindly ask CJ to ship your compost bin back to you on the ferry asap and stop hiding it amongst his outdoor furniture...what a cheeky brother he is.
    Stay safe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm never sure, Virginia, whether it's better to live in an area like this where we are prepared for storms and, generally speaking, things that could blow away have already gone or were not put there in the first place or live in a place where storms are rare but when they occur they wreak real havoc (such as the South of England). How do you fare in tropical storms?

      Delete
    2. Growing up here in the Caribbean, it's a given that we will be visited by storms and hurricanes.
      We do the best we can by following all the hurricane preparedness tips issued by the Government Information Service.
      I find it useful to track the storms/hurricanes myself since I am a weather enthusiast.

      Delete
  12. Replies
    1. Thanks Red. I've managed so far.

      Delete
  13. Batten down the hatches! Wouldn't have wanted to be out in that storm. Glad you escaped relatively intact. Quite the opposite here - hot, still and dry. Do take care.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'd swap this for some heat Pauline! Hatches battened down and storm shutters up.

      Delete
  14. Very scary, and I'm glad nothing worse happened to you and your property. Very high winds here since yesterday afternoon, but not strong enough to be called a storm. That's expected for today. In the north of Germany, though, things were different; many of the ferries going out to the Friesian islands have stopped operating until it's over, which is supposed to be on Sunday.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Meike I suspect the Friesian Islands are in for an even worse blow in the next day or so.

      Delete
  15. That last photo could be used in a new Arnold Clark van hire advertisement - "We go places other van hire companies won't go".

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. YP I'm sure they loved the publicity: it made the Scottish TV News.

      Delete
  16. Oh Graham, I am so sorry! High winds like that are scary and when they come at night, even more so when you can't really see what is happening, you can only hear it.
    Take care in cleaning up.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Kay all is well. That was the scene that met me ten years ago almost to the day when we had our previous hurricane.

      Delete
  17. So thankful you must be to have little damage and to be safe and sound. Cleanup can be very hard after a major storm like that. And, what must it do to the land to have huge storms one right after the other.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Major storms are always a problem PTGWS but I try and put them into perspective. We have the minor inconvenience (which seems like a catastrophe at the time) of some property damage (usually insured) and power outages and transport disruption. A similar storm in many parts of the world can be absolutely disastrous with many people homeless and entire communities wiped out.

      Delete
  18. Good grief. I have not been watching TV and so had no idea of the extent of this. I think it was your description of the SOUND of it which really brought it home to me. I suppose it is worse with all the open space and nothing to stop the wind - would you agree? I am glad you didn't have much damage this time, and I dare say the birds (cf your newer post) will adjust in time! :)

    ReplyDelete